Missouri Synod Church in Downtown Memphis

News & Notes

What a Great Day for a Picnic!

What a Great Day for a Picnic!

Trinity was indeed blessed with great weather, great hospitality, great music, great message, great food, and great fun. All thanks to God from whom all blessings flow. If you were not among the more than two hundred to managed to find their way to the Ornamental Metal Museum we certainly hope that you will be able to join us next year. ( Depending on your connections, it make take a moment or two for the images to download. )

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Sunday School Ready For A New Season

We’re gearing up for a great year with an amazing Sunday School curriculum for children in Pre-K through Pre-Confirmation (6th grade), called Whirl.  Whirl is based on the seasons of the church year (Pentecost, Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, etc.); Sunday School lessons, Children’s message and Pastor Josh & Deacon Douglas’ sermons will all be tied together.  God has blessed us with a wonderful team teachers.  We’ll kick off our new Sunday School year with Rally Day (for everyone) on September 14th, beginning at 9:45am in the Fellowship Hall with an opening devotion. All teachers will be there to welcome and take the children to their classroom.  Please join us on September 14th! Teachers: Pre-K: Ann Hart, Bethany Sharp, Kerri Neal Elementary (Kt-4th): Doug Campbell, Pat Ellis, Ashley Baskette Pre-Confirmation (5th-6th): Pastor, Deacon, Jeff & Megan Knittel Confirmation (7th-8th): Heidi Shafer, Lisa Dennis High School: Dave & Mary Ellen Broome, Michael Schulte College & Career: Melissa Hatcher, Dan Reilly Our Christmas Program, A Night Like No Other is in the works.  If you can help with making costumes, set building or practices please contact Diane Johnston (230-7233 or cdaacjohnston@yahoo.com).   Sparks and Ignite Discipleship On September 14th and then the first Sunday of each month from 5:30-7:30 Sparks (nursery-6th graders) meet in the large classroom downstairs for supper, Bible story, crafts and games; while the Ignite Group (Young Adults married or single) gather in the Fellowship Hall for supper and Bible Class.  Our first Sparks get-together was on August 5th with 12 children in

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Rethinking Evangelism in America, pt. 2

Rethinking Evangelism in America, pt. 2
by Robert Schmidt Is There a Hell? How do the well-to-do view life after death? Do the richest of the rich go to church? Churches may indeed enjoy the largesse of their donations. Some of the wealthy may indeed be profligate in their support of good causes, charities, and non-governmental organizations serving the sick and vulnerable. But what are the percentages? Jesus also saw the wealthy making their contributions but commended the widow for giving one hundred per cent. Certainly a few good works should erase from the rich any fear of the after-life, if, indeed, there is such a thing In a lot of Lutheran churches, hell is not mentioned much. Accenting the positive, we speak of Christ’s redeeming love, his sacrifice on the cross, the forgiveness of sins and the hope of heaven. But the dark side, hell, is pretty much left out of the equation. Afraid to be lumped together with those who threaten hell for gays, false theology and wrong religion, hell is pretty much left on the shelf. After all, we do not want to scare people into heaven. Yet, a closer look at hell in the scriptures might be very instructive for evangelism. In Matthew 25, those thrown into outer darkness are the ones who did not recognize Jesus in the hungry, the thirsty, the ill clothed, the sick, and the imprisoned. The most graphic account is in the parable of the rich man, Dives, and the poor man, Lazarus. Just a drop ofRead more

Rethinking Evangelism in America, pt. 1

Rethinking Evangelism in America, pt. 1

by Robert Schmidt The first worship service I conducted in Africa, I baptized over fifty and confirmed another thirty. We did a preaching, teaching, reaching mission in some unreached areas and the initial house calls turned into proclamations of the Gospel with fifty to one hundred people listening in at every house call. Evangelism services brought in hundreds of villagers and in giving out tracts so many people surrounded me I wished I had at least twelve helpers for the distribution. Needlessly to say, evangelism in America is not like that, at least in most Lutheran churches. Christmas homilies told us to be like the shepherds and make known what they had seen to tell others about Jesus. Jesus is our Savior; he died on the cross and was raised from the dead, for our salvation. Well…. yes, of course….but America is not Bethlehem at the beginning of Anno Domini, nor is it Africa in the 60′s. People have heard the story, maybe they have not believed it, digested it, or applied it to their lives, but they have heard it. So what is the “good news?” Whom Are We Addressing? In the preparation of foreign missionaries at mission school, some time is spent in acquainting new missionaries with the people they will be talking to. Heading off to India, missionaries need to know something about Hinduism and Islam. Going to Africa or New Guinea, you will have to understand something about animism. For China and Japan, is it Buddhism,

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The 8 Most Dangerous Christian Prayers… #5 Ruined my Life

There are different forms of Christian prayer, but whether you have a set prayer time or seek to communicate with God throughout the day (or some combination of both), here are 10 Christian prayers that are extremely dangerous to pray. This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t pray them … we should! It just means that when we pray them, we should watch out! Read the rest of this article by Jeremy Myers on his Till He Comes website.

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What language did Jesus speak? The pope and Israel’s prime minister disagree.

Last week, on his tour of the Holy Land, Pope Francis met with Prime Minister Netanyahu. During their discussion, a disagreement of sorts emerged as to what language Jesus spoke. This article in the Washington Post gives the details.

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Gangway to Galilee – Trinity VBS is underway!

This year’s Vacation Bible Study is entitled Gangway to Galilee. It is based on the theme: Jesus Gives Amazing Grace. Participants are figuratively journeying around the Sea of Galilee to learn about God’s life-giving Word. Teams are joining in many activities as they engage in Bible learning as they read, see, and interact with the Bible lessons. Each lesson will have a nautical theme, center on one of the bible stories about Jesus on and around the Sea of Galilee. Diane Johnston and crew have worked hard to make this a truly exciting and memorable experience for everyone. Trinity Vacation Bible Study is being held each Sunday during the regular Sunday School time.

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Choir Selection from Maundy Thursday

For those of you who may not have been fortunate enough to hear the choral selection from Maundy Thursday’s service, we present it here for your enjoyment and inspiration. (Click the white triangle to the far left on the player bar to begin play)

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Trinity Brewers Softball!

Trinity Brewers Softball!

For the first time in years, Trinity is fielding a softball team to play in our Memphis-area Lutheran softball league! Games will be held on Sunday afternoons at Immanuel Lutheran Church (6319 Raleigh Lagrange Road). If you’re interested in joining our team, email Coach Jakob Holz at jholz@shipyard.com. Or if you’d just prefer an afternoon of fun and fellowship, bring a lawn chair out to Immanuel and support the team. League play begins April 6th, and we’ll be posting game times on our parish calendar as they become available. Go Brewers!

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This Week

Listen to this weeks sermon by Dr. Morrison

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Abortion and the Gospel

I recently had the opportunity to hear a presentation by a well-known prolife speaker on abortion. The argument against abortion, he said, lay in the answer to the question “Is the fetus a human being or not?” In meticulous fashion he presented his case which in substance said that if you can prove to an abortion proponent or a woman considering abortion that the fetus is a human being you have won your argument. Winning means that the proponent will give up his case or a woman considering abortion will not submit to an abortion. This article is reprinted from The Lutheran Witness. Perhaps it is that I spent twenty years as hospital chaplain counseling, among others, women in their decision making that I find this argument overstated. Of all the women I counseled who were considering abortion I never had one tell me she did not believe the fetus within her was a human being. In fact, she would have thought it naive of me that I would even press the point. She would have said, “Of course, it is human, but I don’t want to be pregnant.” In the non-Lutheran presentation referred to above, what struck me was the overbearance of Law and the absence of Gospel. Hammering away with rational explanation, the speaker concluded with an in-your-face video hideously depicting torn fetal body parts, all of which shattered any further reasonable discussion of the issue. Lutheran theology claims, and rightly so, that Law doesn’t transform people, the

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The Kenya Micro Loan Project

Deaconesses are “tireless workers, carrying out God’s mercy and compassion for people throughout Kenya,” says the Rev. David Chuchu, the ELCK Diakonia Compassionate Ministry (DCM) project coordinator. But deaconesses also struggle with many of the same financial strains that affect the people they serve. Today, small-business training and a micro-loan project made possible with help from an LCMS Mercy Grant encourage deaconesses who pursue their own entrepreneurial projects. Messiah Lutheran Church, Danville, and Holy Cross Lutheran Church, Rocklin, both in California, have also provided financial support. The goal is to help the women “gain confidence, financial independence and a sense of pride in their work, both as a businesswoman and as a deaconess,” Chuchu says. “This will, in turn, allow them greater freedom to serve others through the love and mercy of Christ.” Deaconess leaders completed project training last year in Kisumu. Grace Jobita, a micro-loan consultant, taught business components; the Rev. Dr. Arthur Just, professor, Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Ind.; and Deaconess Pamela Boehle-Silva, RN, of Holy Cross Lutheran Church, led theological insights and made home visits. Now the trained deaconesses are shepherding groups in dioceses of the LCMS partner church in Kenya, helping others form savings groups and apply for micro-loans to start businesses. Entrepreneurial pursuits include brick making, dairy farming, importing shoes and raising rice and vegetables. The project is open to all ELCK deaconesses. Long-range plans are for ELCK pastors, evangelists and congregations to also participate. Mary Khainga, a deaconess trainer in the Central Diocese,

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